The Urgent Call for RN Psychotherapists in Trauma Recovery Post-COVID-19

The Urgent Call For RN Psychotherapists In Trauma Recovery Post-COVID-19

In the wake of the unprecedented challenges wrought by the COVID-19 pandemic, our collective resilience has been tested on myriad fronts. While hospitals and make-shift healthcare facilities were full of patients, another silent disease ran rampant through homes across the country – and research warns its impact may last longer than initially anticipated.

Travel restrictions, mandatory quarantines, and city-wide lockdowns caused many people to be separated from their loved ones. The fear of contracting the coronavirus itself and economic uncertainty pushed people to the edge. Multiple surveys have shown that symptoms of mental health issues may have been present before the pandemic. However, the impact of the pandemic intensified these symptoms.

Similarly, higher numbers of young adults screened positive for anxiety and depression between the fall of 2020 and spring of 2021. A higher percentage of adults reported experiencing negative feelings due to the pandemic. Among all Canadians who screened positive for PTSD, anxiety, or depression during this period, 94% reported being negatively affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Mental Health Crisis

rn psychotherapists in trauma recovery

Research shows that the psychological fallout of the COVID-19 pandemic, compounded by pre-existing mental health struggles, has cast a dark shadow over the well-being of individuals within the general population. Beyond the immediate concerns of virus transmission, the upheavals caused by travel restrictions, lockdowns, and economic uncertainties have instigated a profound shift in the collective psyche.

As workplaces adapted to remote models and faced disruptions, the blurred lines between professional and personal life created an additional layer of stress. The blend of psychological factors, including isolation, fear of infection, and economic strain, has caused unprecedented levels of anxiety and depression. Beyond the statistics lies a palpable urgency, a call for specialized professionals equipped to address the profound impact of trauma. And RN psychotherapists are uniquely qualified to address such issues.

Healthcare Heroes and Burnout

mental health heroes

In the early weeks of the COVID-19 pandemic, nurses and other healthcare professionals were lauded as heroes. They selflessly cared for others while struggling to protect themselves from getting infected. There were meal donations, military flyovers, signs expressing thanks on prominent buildings, and fire department drive-byes with sirens blaring. And all healthcare professionals appreciated this outpouring of support.

But two or more years is a long period, even for the best of the heroes. Over time, signs of burnout became apparent in the healthcare workplaces. As the COVID-19 infections surged, dropped, and surged again, nurses and other healthcare workers began to wonder how long they could keep going.

According to a 2021 study that assessed the impact of COVID-19 on critical care nurses, 100% of the study participants reported moderate to high burnout. 74% reported symptoms of PTSD, 70% reported depression, and 57% of the study participants reported anxiety. Also, 61% of the study participants reported stress while 22% intended to quit their jobs.

The Role of RN Psychotherapist

In this crucible of challenges, a call echoes through the healthcare landscape – a call for specialized professionals who can navigate the complex interplay between post-COVID psychological trauma and other stressors. This is where the unique role of Registered Nurse (RN) psychotherapists comes into focus, offering not only solace to the wounded psyche but also a lifeline for those battling physical health issues.

The role of RN psychotherapist

The current shortage of psychotherapists and other mental health experts presents a formidable barrier to timely and effective trauma recovery. In this critical gap, Registered Nurse (RN) psychotherapists with a private practice emerge as transformative professionals, equipped to bridge the divide. While primary health care professionals play a crucial role, the complex nature of trauma diagnosis and recovery demands professionals with board-level certification in psychiatric care – a domain where RN psychotherapists seamlessly belong.

Further, embarking on the journey to becoming a psychotherapist not only addresses the shortage of specialized professionals but also contributes to personal healing. This transformative career transcends conventional nursing roles, offering a unique opportunity for nurses to venture into psychotherapy. RN psychotherapists fill a crucial societal need but find profound fulfilment in guiding individuals through the complexities of trauma recovery.

The call to become an RN psychotherapist echoes the promise of a career that not only heals others but transforms the very fabric of one’s professional identity. It’s time to curve your role as an RN psychotherapist and pioneer holistic health and personal transformation.

For a deeper understanding of this impactful profession, check my article: How to Become an RN Psychotherapist.

Why Becoming Method™

1 in 5 people will experience a mental illness and we're here to change that

Table of Contents

Table of Contents

Why Becoming Method™

1 in 5 people will experience a mental illness and we're here to change that

10,000 Hours

We are providing complimentary access to 10,000 hours of trauma recovery care.

10,000 Hours

We are providing complimentary access to 10,000 hours of trauma recovery care.

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